PUPILLAGE & HOW TO GET IT: A WHOLE NEW OUTLOOK: A WEBSITE WELL WORTH READING

One of the (many) surprising things I have come across as a result of starting this blog is a recommendation (almost a requirement) from a prominent set of chambers that their prospective pupils read it before attending for interviews . This is nice but, frankly I could do without that kind of pressure.  My plan is to divert all those prospective pupils off to the rewritten site Pupillage and how to get it.  Re-launched by Simon Myerson QC and “Beheshteh Engineer”. It is a major and impressive site – law students you will be better off spending your time there than reading about the latest problems with service of the claim form.

GO THERE (AND NOT HERE)

“Containing advice from pupils, juniors, careers advisors, and senior barristers, the pupillage guide stands at c. 22,000 words and has taken almost 300 hours to produce.”

It is clearly a labour of love.  Thorough, comprehensive and dealing with every aspect of the pupillage process.

Included are “how to handle rejection” (Rejection is a good thing, it is training for the emotions you get when you lose a case).  How to handle multiple offers (I have known someone be rejected outright one year and be holding three offers the following year).

SOCIAL MEDIA – THINGS NOT TO DO

Also there is a useful section of “Social media and good judgement”. Many, if not all,  prospective employers  and chambers will take a look at a candidate’s social media activity.  The advice given includes:-

 

  • Candid posts on The Student Room (TSR) Pupillage thread: both chambers & the Bar Council check this thread regularly. Bear this in mind when you choose your username, when you are posting something that might identify you and when you are criticising chambers. By all means, be honest, but stay respectful and diplomatic.
  • Add barristers you don’t know on LinkedIn: this isn’t welcome. This is not how to network. Just don’t do it.
  • “Debate posts” i.e. where you make some kind of controversial statement about the Bar and/or complain about the process. This is usually a very bad idea.
  • Use Twitter like you’re 16: this can include a variety of things, such as not typing in coherent sentences, having a profile photo of you in a nightclub outfit or using slang terminology. Keep it professional.
  • Pupil-specific points: don’t live-tweet cases (could be contempt of court), and do not post anything that may lead to your client being identified without their specific permission to the specific context. That includes “I am in Southwark today on a rape”. Don’t openly criticise judges or other advocates, and never take credit for work you did for your supervisor. 

BUT DON’T, JUST DON’T, READ SIMON’S JOKES

There is a section of Simon’s jokes. I can do a good line in bad jokes,  but these are really bad.

“What’s the difference between God and a Barrister? God doesn’t think He’s a barrister.”

To be fair it comes with a warning

Please do not crack these in interviews and expect to get a Pupillage.”