CIVIL PROCEDURE BACK TO BASICS 43: CROSS EXAMINING EXPERTS: USEFUL GUIDES AND LINKS

Cross-examining experts is possibly one of the most daunting aspects of advocacy.  If an advocate gets into a “debate” with an expert then the advocate normally loses. If the advocate is too brutal the cross-examination can backfire, too supine and deferential and the case can be lost.  Here is a list of useful guides and guidance to assist in that cross-examination.

THE ROLE OF THE EXPERT IN CIVIL PROCEEDINGS

There is no doubt  about the role of the expert in civil proceedings. The expert’s function is to assist the Court.  The rule is set out in CPR 35.3.

“Experts – overriding duty to the court

35.3
(1) It is the duty of experts to help the court on matters within their expertise.
(2) This duty overrides any obligation to the person from whom experts have received instructions or by whom they are paid.”

CROSS-EXAMINING EXPERTS IN CIVIL PROCEEDINGS

This may well be becoming a rare event. The development of joint meetings and joint statements means that many apparent differences between the experts are ironed out before the trial.  However when the experts do not agree the key issues of disagreement, and the reasons for them, should be clear.

HINTS ON CROSS-EXAMINING EXPERTS

There are numerous articles, posts and videos which give the advocate assistance in cross-examining experts. Many, but not all of these, come from the United States.

“Another lesson from this research is to remember to be unfailingly polite with all witnesses. You are on display at all  times to the jurors and they will make judgments about you and your case based on  how you approach witnesses“.

CHAPTERS FROM BOOKS

One of the best books on cross-examination is Francis H Wellman’s “Cross-examination”. The chapter on cross examining expert witnesses is available free on-line (as indeed is the whole book).

TRIAL TRANSCRIPTS

Sir Harry Ognall’s cross-examination of the psychiatric experts in the “Yorkshire Ripper”/Peter Sutcliffe trial makes for fascinating reading.

IS THERE A THEME TO ALL OF THESE TEXTS?

All of these texts (and I have selected a few of many) put different emphasis in the task of cross-examination.  The common themes emerge from the Expert Institute post.

1. Be prepared.  The cross-examination of experts is not something that can be done off the cuff.

2. Have a plan.

3. Ask fact specific, cross-examination, questions.

4. Never ask a question you don’t know the answer to.

5. Listen to the answers.