2019 AND CIVIL PROCEDURE THE YEAR IN REVIEW: FACTS, FIGURES AND SEARCH TERMS: “CAN A DEAD PERSON BE TAKEN TO COURT?”

The statistics at the end of the year are always interesting (to me at least).  The search terms that lead to this blog can be quite illuminating (and sometimes quite alarming…).

 

MOST READ POSTS OF 2019

After seven years I have ceased to be surprised that it is the thorny issue of bundles that dominate the reading.

SEARCH TERMS

The most popular search term is “civil litigation brief”.

the second most popular search term is “amazon” (I don’t understand that either).

There are always number of strange terms that lead to this blog. These are just a sample.
  • Counsel wrongly reargued case in letter to judge about draft judgment
  • Is there an obligation for each party to serve on the other side their witness statements
  • Is the hippocratic oath legal.
  • If you are going to draft pleadings then do it properly.
  • If court proceedings are served on a solicitor without authority is that good service?
  • What happens when judgment is entered against the wrong defendant?
  • Can a deceased person be subpoenaed to court?
  • What is the difference between witness statement and submission.
  • County court judge has ignored evidence of fraud.
  • I’ve been committed to prison for contempt of court in London. Where am I likely to be sent?
  • Consequences of serving pleadings at the wrong address.
  • Can you submit a witness statement to the court after the deadline.
  • Can you deny authenticity of a document you pled “spoke for itself”.
  • Can a solicitor sign a witness statement on behalf of a client.
  • Claimant serves on solicitor’s old address.
  • Can a claimant remove its own judgment obtained by fraud.
  • Is a position statement and a witness statement the same.
  • Solicitor misses deadline because of wrong address.
  • Judge wrong to accept counsel give evidence [sic]
  • What if bill of costs were exaggerated.
  • Can a dead person be taken to court?
  • Can you accept damages after a case has been struck out?
  • Obstructing payment of a costs order in order to accrue additional interest.