COVID REPEATS 47: WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN THINGS HAVE GONE WRONG? MEANINGFUL ADVICE FROM PEOPLE WHO KNOW (AND CARE): WHEN YOU THINK SOMETHING IS HITTING THE FAN

Here I am repeating a post that was originally “crowd sourced” from Twitter. It is a post  on “what to do if things go wrong”.    Here is the advice specifically on what the best course of action is when something his awry – when it is, or may be your fault, or when people are blaming you anyway.  I had forgotten how “immediate” social media is, dozens of replies came in almost immediately.  They carry a common theme: admit the mistake, seek help, attempting to cover up the mistake is far, far worse, than the mistake itself.

 

“My good friend once led with “your honour I have looked exhaustively at who is to blame for this and I’m afraid that it is me””

THE CHALLENGE…

Supervision doesn’t cover everything (eg claim done but not sent), but the principle holds true. Supervisor should take responsibility, and we all make mistakes at times.

Ask for help and support, everyone needs to ask questions it is not a bad thing.

Depends on why the sky is falling in on you. Ask yourself why you became a lawyer in the first place. If it was for a corrupt intent, or if your firm has corrupted you, accept you are the problem. Otherwise, the Law always allows for a solution.

Depends on why the sky is falling in on you. Ask yourself why you became a lawyer in the first place. If it was for a corrupt intent, or if your firm has corrupted you, accept you are the problem. Otherwise, the Law always allows for a solution.

If you are NQ, your mistakes are your supervisor’s mistakes too. Either they didn’t supervise closely enough or gave you too much responsibility. A good supervisor will recognise this and share both the client and emotional burden with you.

Unless you messed up pagniating. In which case it’s on you. Page turn next time.

The Ground Swallow Me feeling when the employment judge says “I appear not to have a page 104.” Never trust the machines. Ever.

Before taking your mistake to someone senior for advice or help, which is a must, prepare a full note of the case and your actions/inactions. It will help immensely in finding a solution, and make sure you send it to your insurer. Whatever the result the sun will rise tomorrow.

1. Breathe. If you can calm down and see the wood for the trees you may realise what you need to do to sort it out. 2. Tell your supervisor whether you know how sort it or not. You will often find that it’s not as bad as you thought. 3. Take action immediately.

Lawyers in trouble. Just an extra thought Gordon. It must sometimes be difficult to raise a difficult problem with an employer. Another possibility is to suggest that solicitors in difficulty could talk to their Council Member. Generally speaking we are a worldly wise lot (as well as being world weary) but we are there because we are dedicated to the solicitors profession. There is a Council member for virtually every area in England and Wales and I believe any one of us would be happy to help someone in our patch who has got into difficulty

1. Remember 99.9% of problems can be fixed & costs penalties are not the end of the world. 2. Ask for help and make sure your manager is in the loop. 3. Never sacrifice your integrity. 4. Do what you can in a timely manner. 5. Remember the sun will still rise tomorrow.